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Benefits

The Health Evolution P.L.A.N. - Pure Live Active Nutrition - formulas have two main ways of working:

#1 Balancing cortisol, the stress hormone: high levels of cortisol = low immunity levels

A poor immune system results in:
- being vulnerable to ill-health
- poor cognition
- not healing
- digestive issues
More information about this below

#2 Regenerating your own stem cells, so you rebuild from the inside out


Your stem cells are the body's raw materials — cells from which all other specialized cells are generated. Stem cells divide to form more cells called daughter cells, which either become new stem cells (self-renewal) or become specialized cells (differentiation) with a more specific function, such as blood cells, brain cells, heart muscle cells or bone cells.
No other cell in the body has the natural ability to generate new cell types.
Researchers and doctors say stem cells can generate healthy cells (regenerative medicine) to regenerate and repair diseased or damaged tissues in people.
Rebalancing and rebuilding your brain and body are important because you can experience major and varied benefits.
We only use the recommended clinical therapeutic dose for each ingredient because otherwise it's like having a drop of water when you're dying of thirst: the right amount of the genuine ingredient is essential.

Read on to find out more, or choose your formula here: healthevolutionproject.com/pages/which-formulas

For a snapshot of the science, go to our science page here healthevolutionproject.com/pages/science

In more detail:

Understandably, right now people are desperately asking how to "support the immune system". 

Technically, Doctors and researchers agree it's not possible to "support" immunity, because once the immune system is working correctly it can't "work better".
But most people's immune systems are not working well.
What is possible is to support and maintain immunity.
That's what our formulas do.

Unfortunately, the additional stress and worry caused by the global pandemic is only contributing to the crisis of widespread poor immunity. 

 

Any "insult" to the brain or body is a stressor.

 

Poor air quality, toxins in water and food (including the artificial chemicals in processed food, poor quality supplements and medications), lack of nutrition, poor sleep, worry and stress ... 

 

All these "stressors" cause cortisol to rise in response to the perceived threats ... and raised level of cortisol equals a low level of immunity.

 

The World Health Organisation says stress is the health epidemic of the 21st Century. This is because as humans we are much more susceptible to diseases, viruses, bad bacteria, and mental health problems when we are stressed. 

 

The stress hormone cortisol shuts down the immune system making us vulnerable to viruses, disease, infection, and poor mental health. 

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There is evidence that higher cortisol and stress levels can activate - and reactivate - a number of viruses. 

 

Even more importantly, there is evidence that T-cells are influenced by cortisol responses to viral infections. 

 

SARS research - which is a good model for the current pandemic - demonstrates that depleted CD4 T-cells gives higher replication of the virus and a greater viral disease effect. 

 

There is also evidence to suggest that outcomes in SARS in humans were directly related to a T-cell response, and cortisol interferes with this process. 

 

It makes sense on many levels to reduce cortisol as the #1 way to be resistant to coronavirus.  

 

Of course, there are drug companies researching ways to reduce viral load, reduce community infection rates, and potentially improve severity of disease - all by targeting cortisol. 

 

There is also a post SARS syndrome where people infected have cognitive defects and this links to persistent low cortisol. 

 

It may be that during such virus infection, people have a hyper response to cortisol (stress response) which then blunts cortisol during recovery. 

 

It may be that managing cortisol also manages any post cognitive effects due to a brain pituitary axis disturbance providing some protection. 

 

Of course, here at Health Evolution we are not a drug company and so we cannot and do not make any claims to treat, cure, prevent, or diagnose any disease.  

 

We do, however, provide products proven to manage cortisol, the stress hormone. 

 

Proven for more than 90 years, with no side effects. 

 

Because our formulas use YTE® which is a rare, all-natural ingredient, our raw ingredients cost is high, whereas a drug company is looking for a cheap chemical fix. 

 

There is no drug currently available to safely manage cortisol. 

 

But Health Evolution formulas do manage cortisol, with clinical trials to prove it. 

 

The links between out-of-control cortisol and disease, virus infection, and poor mental health are all clinically proven. 

 

YTE® AT RECOMMENDED CLINICAL DOSE IS THE #1 WAY TO MANAGE OUT-OF-CONTROL CORTISOL, THE STRESS HORMONE WHICH DESTROYS IMMUNITY 

 

We are facing the "perfect storm" of an epidemic combined with a pandemic. 

 

  • Low Energy
  • Inflammation
  • Trouble sleeping
  • Slow metabolism
  • Constant worrying
  • Stubborn weight gain
  • Anxiety and overwhelm
  • Lack of clarity and focus
  • Low mood and tiredness
  • Poor memory and brain fog
  • Cravings and poor digestion
  • Cuts and wounds slow to heal 

 

Every one of these symptoms has been linked with out of control cortisol, a condition also known as chronic stress and “allostatic load”. 

 

Now more than ever it is essential to modulate your cortisol levels. 

 

High-stress leads to high cortisol levels ... which leads to high-stress. 

 

It's essential to break the cycle to achieve a strong immune system, naturally and quickly.  

 

What is chronic stress? 

 

Simply when our bodies don't recover from one stress factor before another piles on, and another, and another ... 

 

Our body and brain both react to be hyper-vigilant and "ready to run". 

 

But we don't respond in ways to alleviate the stress before another stress trigger comes in ... so our heart rate is higher, our mind is racing, we're "wired" ... and over time that dulls into constant fatigue and overwhelm. 

 

Because our brains and bodies are overworked, poor physical and mental health result. Including vulnerability to viruses. 

 

There are three ways we can be chronically stressed:

Physical: trauma, injury, accident or fall

 

Chemical and biological: viruses, flu, infection, hangovers, unbalanced blood sugar levels, toxic loads from processed food, environmental chemicals

 

Emotional:  fear, work or business pressure, financial problems, family tragedies, inherited trauma, exposure to negative news and constant advertising.

 

When chronically stressed, our body and brain are on constant high alert, in fight or flight mode, and therefore other "housekeeping" tasks are shut down. Including complex tasks such as proper digestion, healing, immunity, relaxation, and restorative sleep.   

 

To support the immune system naturally and quickly, forget so-called immune system supplements like vitamins B, C, D, E, zinc, magnesium, probiotics, prebiotics, colloidal silver, saunas, and all the rest ... taking these without addressing cortisol levels is like driving with one foot on the gas (accelerator) and the other stamped down hard on the brake.

You're going nowhere fast and just burning fuel and rubber. Wearing out the engine and all the moving parts. 

 

That's why you MUST get your cortisol under control, first. 

 

That's why our formulas are called the foundational formulas. 

 

TeloMind, AminoBoosters, AminoB12 all have full recommended clinical dose YTE®. This TeloMind1600mg/daily dose manages and modulates your cortisol naturally, safely, and quickly. 

 

In addition, we strongly recommend taking AminoSerene as a supplementary formula. 

 

In the same way that TeloMind, AminoBoosters, and AminoB12 contain all the amino acids in perfect natural balance and at the recommended clinical dose ... so AminoSerene contains all the B vitamins at the recommended clinical dose. 

 

Vitamin B6 and B12 in particular are recommended as immune system supplements - but they only work their best when all the B vitamin complex is present, and when bioavailable forms are used. 

 

We only use the most bioavailable forms of the entire B vitamin complex, including MecobalActive® B12.  

 

Most supplements use cheap versions which simply don't work. 

 

Looking for proof? 

 

The only 60-second-a-day way to modulate cortisol, the stress hormone, while at the same time regenerating stem cells. 

 

Now, you can not only feel the difference when stress is gone, you can prove it. 

   

 The #1 way to support immunity is to balance cortisol

Now, you can not only feel the difference when stress is gone, you can prove it.

The unique DNA-test lets you measure your success, by measuring the length of your telomeres to determine your biological age versus your chronological age.

 

The good news is you can change the length of your telomeres. The fastest way to do so is to move from a chronically stressed state of excess cortisol. 

 

Health Evolution clinical dose P.L.A.N. - Pure Live Active Nutrition - formulas are the only 60-second-a-day way to modulate cortisol, the stress hormone, while at the same time regenerating stem cells.

 

Select your choice of formula here: TeloMind, AminoBoosters, AminoB12 or the Ultimate Health & Immunity System:

 

 

What does the telomere test measure?

Tracks your cellular age based on your telomere length

The test is based on a simple at-home blood test

Why measure?

Yes, people can change their telomeres with a healthier lifestyle.

Our customers are already doing exactly that.

Check out Michelle, who went from biological age 82 to 53 in just six months - and the ONLY thing Michelle did differently was taking our formula. 

 

Michelle is actually aged 49 in chronological years but suffers a chronic incurable disease: with our supplements, she's able to keep her job, reduce how old she felt - and how old her body said she was - by a staggering nearly 30 years!

We are so confident in the results of our products, we make it easy for you to prove it to yourself.

Simply arrange your telomere test and then take your supplements every day.

Take another telomere test after 6 months of positive changes, and see the results.

Results are so motivating - now as well as feeling the difference, you can see the evidence.

Get Your Telomere Test: The Details

Get Your Telomere Test here: 

https://healthevolutionproject.com/collections/telomere-tests

The P.L.A.N. Pure Live Active Nutrition YTE® formulas are brought to you by Health Evolution, a privately held science-based dietary supplements company founded by health and research advocates, advised by world-famous medical specialists.

The telomeres genetic test is brought to you by Telomere Diagnostics Inc., a privately held molecular testing company founded by a group of scientists including the winner of the 2009 Nobel Prize in Medicine for her work in telomere biology.

We arrange the test for you within 24 hours of purchase, and can arrange the follow up in 6 months' time. 

Ready to get started

Combining the only source of P.L.A.N. Formulas: Pure Live Active Nutrition with Young Tissue Extract Dynamic Protein YTE®. Health Evolution provides four supplements of personalised life-changing nutrition, for professionals who expect more.

The only 60-second-a-day way to modulate cortisol, the stress hormone, while at the same time regenerating stem cells.

So you can not only feel the difference when stress is gone, you can prove it.


If you have questions, you can contact Co-founder Angela Wright MBE personally by calling  (225) 442-9766 or emailing angela@healthevolutionproject.com, or scheduling a call at calendly.com/angelawright

Place your order today:

https://healthevolutionproject.com/collections/all

Sources: 

Cortisol and Cognition

Midlife stress alters memory and mood-related behaviors in old age: Role of locally activated glucocorticoids

Psychoneuroendocrinology 89 (2018) 13–22. Nicola Wheelan, Christopher J. Kenyon, Anjanette P. Harris, Carolynn Cairns, Emad Al Dujaili, Jonathan R. Seckl, Joyce L.W. Yau (2018)

11β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase inhibition improves cognitive function in healthy elderly men and type 2 diabetics

PNAS, 101(17), 6734-6739. Sandeep, T. C., Yau, J. L. W., MacLullich, A. M. J., Noble, J., Deary, I. J., Walker, B. R., & Seckl, J. R. (2004).

Cognitive and disease-modifying effects of 11β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase type 1 inhibition in male Tg2576 mice, a model of Alzheimer’s disease

Endocrinology, 1-12. Sooy, K., Noble, J., McBride, A., Binnie, M., Yau, J. L. W., Seckl, J. R., Walker, B. R., & Webster, S. P. (2015).

Inhibiting 11β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase type 1 prevents stress effects on hippocampal synaptic plasticity and impairs contextual fear conditioning

Neuropharmacology, 81, 231-6. Sarabdjitsingh, R. A., Zhou, M., Yau, J. L., Webster, S. P., Walker, B.R., Seckl, J. R., Joëls, M., & Krugers, H. J. (2014).

11β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase type 1, brain atrophy and cognitive decline

Journal of Neurobiological Aging, 33(1), 5406-13. MacLullich, A. M. 1., Ferguson, K. J., Reid, L. M., Deary, I. J., Starr, J. M., Wardlaw, J. M., Walker, B. R., Andrew, R., & Seckl, J. R. (2012).

Acute inhibition of 11beta-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase type-1 improves memory in rodent models of cognition

Journal of Neuroscience, 31(4), 5406-13. Mohler, E. G., Browman, K. E., Roderwald, V. A., Cronin, E. A., Markosyan, S., Scott Bitner, R., Strakhova, M. I., Drescher, K. U., Hornberger, W., Rohde, J. J., Brune, M. E., Jacobson, P. B., & Rueter, L. E. (2011).

11beta-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase type 1 expression is increased in the aged mouse hippocampus and parietal cortex and causes memory impairments

Journal of Neuroscience, 30(20), 6916-20. Holmes, M. C., Carter, R. N., Noble, J., Chitnis, S., Dutia, A., Paterson, J. M., Mullins, J. J., Seckl, J. R., Yau, J.L. (2010).

Partial deficiency or short-term inhibition of 11β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase type 1 improves cognitive function in aging mice

Journal of Neuroscience, 30(41), 13867-13872. Sooy, K., Webster, S. P., Noble, J., Binnie, M., Walker, B. R., Seckl, J. R., & Yau, J. L. W. (2010). 

Cortisol and Alzheimer's

Cognitive and disease-modifying effects of 11β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase type 1 inhibition in male Tg2576 mice, a model of Alzheimer’s disease

Endocrinology, 1-12. Sooy, K., Noble, J., McBride, A., Binnie, M., Yau, J. L. W., Seckl, J. R., Walker, B. R., & Webster, S. P. (2015).

Selection and early clinical evaluation of the brain-penetrant 11β- hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase type 1 (11β-HSD1) inhibitor UE2343 (Xanamem™)

British Journal of Pharmacology. Scott P Webster, AndrewMcBride, Margaret Binnie, Karen Sooy, Jonathan R Seckl, Ruth Andrew, T David Pallin, Hazel J Hunt, Trevor R Perrior, Vincent S Ruffles, J William Ketelbey, Alan Boyd and Brian R Walker (2017).

Discovery and biological evaluation of adamantyl amide 11β-HSD1 inhibitors

Bioorganic & medicinal chemistry letters, 17(10), 2838-2843. Webster, S. P., Ward, P., Binnie, M., Craigie, E., McConnell, K. M., Sooy, K., Vinter, A., Seckl, J.R. & Walker, B. R. (2007). 

Cortiosl and Xanamem

Cognitive and disease-modifying effects of 11β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase type 1 inhibition in male Tg2576 mice, a model of Alzheimer’s disease

Endocrinology, 1-12. Sooy, K., Noble, J., McBride, A., Binnie, M., Yau, J. L. W., Seckl, J. R., Walker, B. R., & Webster, S. P. (2015).

Selection and early clinical evaluation of the brain-penetrant 11β- hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase type 1 (11β-HSD1) inhibitor UE2343 (Xanamem™)

British Journal of Pharmacology. Scott P Webster, AndrewMcBride, Margaret Binnie, Karen Sooy, Jonathan R Seckl, Ruth Andrew, T David Pallin, Hazel J Hunt, Trevor R Perrior, Vincent S Ruffles, J William Ketelbey, Alan Boyd and Brian R Walker (2017).

Discovery and biological evaluation of adamantyl amide 11β-HSD1 inhibitors

Bioorganic & medicinal chemistry letters, 17(10), 2838-2843. Webster, S. P., Ward, P., Binnie, M., Craigie, E., McConnell, K. M., Sooy, K., Vinter, A., Seckl, J.R. & Walker, B. R. (2007). 

Cortisol and Health Evolution YTE® Formulas:

TeloMind Substantiation Document, provided by our independent Dietary Supplement Experts as part of our due diligence during the formulation preparation process:


Of course there are many research papers and reports regarding how chronic stress shortens telomeres.

Clinical evidence demonstrates how YTE® in particular, additionally supported by other ingredients in our formulas, modulates cortisol, the "stress hormone", positively impacting the reduction of chronic stress, and positively affecting telomeres. 

HOW CHRONIC STRESS SHORTENS TELOMERES AND HOW REDUCING CHRONIC STRESS LENGTHENS TELOMERES:

As reported in the American Institute of Stress:

"STRESS, AGING, AND TELOMERES

All the cells in our body contain tiny clocks called telomeres that can determine how long they will live.

Telomeres are little caps at the end of chromosomes that prevent loss or injury to genetic information during cell division. Each time a cell divides, part of the telomere is lost and it becomes shorter.

When a telomere eventually disappears because of repeated cell divisions, chromosomal damage prevents the cell from accurately reproducing itself. This shortening and eventual erosion of telomeres are prevented or reduced by telomerase, an enzyme in cells that preserves their length.

Many believe that telomere destruction and reconstruction is related to the balance between aging and cancer and explains why cancer is more common in the elderly.

In the illustration to the left, chromosomes are stained blue and the protective telomere caps at their ends are stained yellow. Cells with long telomeres live longer. Short telomeres have been linked to a wide range of human diseases, including coronary heart disease, osteoporosis, and HIV infection. Shortening of telomeres is prevented or reduced by telomerase, which has been shown to keep immune cells young by preserving their length and ability to continue to divide and reproduce accurate replicas.

UCLA researchers recently confirmed prior reports that people subjected to chronic stress tended to have shorter telomeres. They have now uncovered a mechanism that explains how stress causes telomere shortening, which could lead to breaking the well-known links between stress and heart disease, as well as accelerated aging. Cells with long telomeres live longer. Short telomeres have been linked to a wide range of human diseases, including coronary heart disease, osteoporosis, and HIV infection. Shortening of telomeres is prevented or reduced by telomerase, which has been shown to keep immune cells young by preserving their length and ability to continue to divide and reproduce accurate replicas.

Chronic stress results in increased secretion of cortisol that causes a rise in blood sugar and blood pressure and reduces inflammation and immune system resistance to infection. However, this new study shows that cortisol also suppresses telomerase activation in immune system cells so that telomeres are no longer protected during cell division and become progressively shorter. This leads to early cell aging and distorted replicas of the original cell that could lead to cancer and other diseases. As the lead author noted in an interview, “We are testing therapeutic ways of enhancing telomerase levels to help the immune system ward off cortisol’s effect. If we’re successful, one day a pill may exist to strengthen the immune system’s ability to weather chronic emotional stress.”" 

This study was approved by the UCLA Institutional Review Board:

Choi J. Fauce SR, Effros RB. Reduced telomerase activity in human T lymphocytes exposed to cortisol. Brain Behavior and Immunity May 2008; 22:600-605 - https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/18222063 - https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2386249/ 

Telomere, Telomerase, and Chronic Stress:

  • Akbar AN, Vukmanovic-Stejic M. Telomerase in T lymphocytes: use it and lose it? J Immunol. 2007;178:6689–6694. [PubMed[]
  • Buchkovich KJ, Greider CW. Telomerase regulation during entry into the cell cycle in normal human T cells. Mol Biol Cell. 1996;7:1443–1454. [PMC free article] [PubMed[]
  • Cacioppo JT, Kiecolt-Glaser JK, Malarkey WB, Laskowski BF, Rozlog LA, Poehlmann KM, et al. Autonomic and glucocorticoid associations with the steady-state expression of latent Epstein-Barr virus. Horm Behav. 2002;42:32–41. [PubMed[]
  • Cao W. PhD Thesis. 2007. Immunological Factors Associated with HIV-1 Disease Progression to AIDS and Death. []
  • Dagarag MD, Evazyan T, Rao N, Effros RB. Genetic manipulation of telomerase in HIV-specific CD8+ T cells:enhanced anti-viral functions accompany the increased proliferative potential and telomere length stabilization. J Immunol. 2004;173:6303–6311. [PubMed[]
  • Damjanovic AK, Yang Y, Glaser R, Kiecolt-Glaser JK, Nguyen H, Laskowski B, Zou Y, Beversdorf DQ, Weng NP. Accelerated telomere erosion is associated with a declining immune function of caregivers of Alzheimer's disease patients. J Immunol. 2007;179:4249–4254. [PMC free article] [PubMed[]
  • Effros RB, Dagarag MD, Spaulding CC, Man J. The role of CD8 T cell replicative senescence in human aging. Immunological Reviews. 2005;205:147–157. [PubMed[]
  • Epel ES, Blackburn EH, Lin J, Dhabhar FS, Adler NE, Morrow JD, et al. Accelerated telomere shortening in response to life stress. Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A. 2004;101:17312–17315. [PMC free article] [PubMed[]
  • Epel ES, Lin J, Wilhelm FH, Wolkowitz OM, Cawthon R, Adler NE, et al. Cell aging in relation to stress arousal and cardiovascular disease risk factors. Psychoneuroendocrinology. 2006;31:277–287. [PubMed[]
  • Gayrard V, Alvinerie M, Toutain PL. Interspecies variations of corticosteroid-binding globulin parameters. Domest Anim Endocrinol. 1996;13:35–45. [PubMed[]
  • Goronzy JJ, Fulbright JW, Crowson CS, Poland GA, O'Fallon WM, Weyand CM. Value of immunological markers in predicting responsiveness to influenza vaccination in elderly individuals. J Virol. 2001;75:12182–12187. [PMC free article] [PubMed[]
  • Harley C, Futcher AB, Greider C. Telomeres shorten during ageing of human fibroblasts. Int Immunol. 1990;345:458–460. [PubMed[]
  • Haynes L, Swain SL. Why aging T cells fail: implications for vaccination. Immunity. 2006;24:663–666. [PubMed[]
  • Kiecolt-Glaser JK, Glaser R, Gravenstein S, Malarkey WB, Sheridan J. Chronic stress alters the immune response to influenza virus vaccine in older adults. Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A. 1996;93:3043–3047. [PMC free article] [PubMed[]
  • Leserman J, Petitto JM, Gu H, Gaynes BN, Barroso J, Golden RN, et al. Progression to AIDS, a clinical AIDS condition and mortality: psychosocial and physiological predictors. Psychol Med. 2002;32:1059–1073. [PubMed[]
  • Liu K, Hodes RJ, Weng N. Cutting edge: telomerase activation in human T lymphocytes does not require increase in telomerase reverse transcriptase (hTERT) protein but is associated with hTERT phosphorylation and nuclear translocation. J Immunol. 2001;166:4826–4830. [PubMed[]
  • Mehta SK, Stowe RP, Feiveson AH, Tyring SK, Pierson DL. Reactivation and shedding of cytomegalovirus in astronauts during spaceflight. J Infect Dis. 2000;182:1761–1764. [PubMed[]
  • Pawelec G, Akbar A, Caruso C, Effros RB, Grubeck-Loebenstein B, Wikby A. Is immunosenescence infectious? Trends Immunol. 2004;25:406–410. [PubMed[]
  • Plunkett FJ, Soares MV, Annels N, Hislop A, Ivory K, Lowdell M, et al. The flow cytometric analysis of telomere length in antigen-specific CD8+ T cells during acute Epstein-Barr virus infection. Blood. 2001;97:700–707. [PubMed[]
  • Simon NM, Smoller JW, McNamara KL, Maser RS, Zalta AK, Pollack MH, et al. Telomere shortening and mood disorders: preliminary support for a chronic stress model of accelerated aging. Biol Psychiatry. 2006;60:432–435. [PubMed[]
  • Stowe RP, Mehta SK, Ferrando AA, Feeback DL, Pierson DL. Immune responses and latent herpesvirus reactivation in spaceflight. Aviat Space Environ Med. 2001;72:884–891. [PubMed[]
  • Valenzuela HF, Effros RB. Divergent telomerase and CD28 expression patterns in human CD4 and CD8 T cells following repeated encounters with the same antigenic stimulus. Clin Immunol. 2002;105:117–125. [PubMed[]
  • Van Laethem F, Baus E, Smyth LA, Andris F, Bex F, Urbain J, et al. Glucocorticoids attenuate T cell receptor signaling. J Exp Med. 2001;193:803–814. [PMC free article] [PubMed[]
  • Weng NP, Palmer LD, Levine BL, Lane HC, June CH, Hodes RJ. Tales of tails: regulation of telomere length and telomerase activity during lymphocyte development, differentiation, activation, and aging. Immunological Reviews. 1997;160:43–54. [PubMed[]
  • Yang EV, Glaser R. Stress-induced immunomodulation: impact on immune defenses against infectious disease. Biomed Pharmacother. 2000;54:245–250. [PubMed[]

Link to the Science pages:

- regarding YTE®

- regarding the other ingredients in our formulas

  • Evidence-based efficacy of adaptogens in fatigue, and molecular mechanisms relat...
    Evidence-based efficacy of adaptogens in fatigue, and molecular mechanisms related to their stress-protective activity.
    Curr Clin Pharmacol. 2009 Sep;4(3):198-219. Epub 2009 Sep 1.
  • The cumulative cost of additional wakefulness: dose-response effects on neurobeh...
    The cumulative cost of additional wakefulness: dose-response effects on neurobehavioral functions and sleep physiology from chronic sleep restriction and total sleep deprivation.
    Sleep. 2003 Mar 15;26(2):117-26.
  • The Effects of Powdered Fertilized Eggs on Depression
    The Effects of Powdered Fertilized Eggs on Depression
    Journal of Medicinal Food. 2011 Jul; 14(7-8)870 
  •  Place your order now and see the difference it can make, either ordering one of our stand-alone supplements or the Ultimate Health & Immunity 30 Day System, here:

     

    Health Evolution and/or Telomere Diagnostics are not intended for screening, diagnosing, treating or preventing diseases or medical conditions. The sites do not offer medical advice and nothing contained in the content is intended to constitute professional advice for medical diagnosis. Results may indicate the possibility of identifying a rare telomere syndrome associated with extremely shorter or longer average telomere length (ATL). In these rare cases, further testing and consultation with a doctor to rule in or rule out a telomere syndrome is recommended. Telomeres testing is available for individuals between the ages of 20 to 80 within the United States, except for the state of New York, and elsewhere by arrangement. The information provided should not be used to replace medically appropriate screening tests recommended based upon actual age or other risk factors, nor should the information be used to make decisions about diagnosis or treatment of diseases or medical conditions. The Diagnostics lab is regulated under the Clinical Laboratory Improvement Amendments of 1988 (CLIA) as qualified to perform high complexity clinical testing with performance characteristics determined by Telomere Diagnostics. It has not been cleared or approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration.

     

     

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